Tuesday, March 25, 2014

CrocLog Podcast - Episode 15

Brandon is currently in Belize helping out on a Morelet's crocodile research project, and we'll be recording a new podcast just as soon as he gets back. In the meantime, here is the long-lost Episode 15 of the podcast. This was recorded back in early December 2013, and for a variety of technical reasons was never quite finished. I've finally managed to get the laptop working that contained the audio editing software (humidity kills everything electronic up here), and you can finally listen to it below.

It's worth a listen because we have a good chat about human crocodile conflict as we discuss the launch of the CrocBITE database. We also end up talking about rattlesnake tails briefly, but soon get back onto the topic and hand by talking about tool use in crocodilians. Brandon discusses a few interesting crocodile attacks from last year, and we end up wondering where all the decent crocodile documentaries have gone lately.

Links to the podcast below:





Direct link / Download

iTunes link

RSS

3 comments:

Ben Lloyd Altarejos said...

Hi Dr Britton,

I saw these videos of Pangil, a giant crocodile in the Philippines w/c measures (according to news) around 18ft: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VgxBSgCPzY and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrufHxbzbPk. While I love the fact that such majestic and big crocodile still exists (especially with the death of Lolong), I am absolutely horrified by the way the animal is being treated in such a callous manner, being poked all the time for him to move for "entertainment" purposes. These videos show an animal in complete distress. Not to mention such a small enclosure for such big crocodile bulk.

I absolutely have no clue on how to help, though i would really like to. I've read your blog a few months (late 2013, I think), when the news of Lolong surfaced around the globe. You're the only crocodile expert I know lol. And that's why I am bringing this up to you in hopes that this will bring international help to this poor animal.

Thanks!

Ben Lloyd Altarejos said...

Hi Dr Britton,

I saw these videos of Pangil, a giant crocodile in the Philippines w/c measures (according to news) around 18ft: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VgxBSgCPzY and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrufHxbzbPk. While I love the fact that such majestic and big crocodile still exists (especially with the death of Lolong), I am absolutely horrified by the way the animal is being treated in such a callous manner, being poked all the time for him to move for "entertainment" purposes. These videos show an animal in complete distress. Not to mention such a small enclosure for such big crocodile.

I absolutely have no clue on how to help, though i would really like to. I've read your blog a few months back (late 2013, I think), when the news of Lolong surfaced around the globe. You're the only crocodile expert I know lol. And that's why I am bringing this up to you in hopes that this will bring international help to this poor animal.

Thanks!

Adam Britton said...

Hi Ben, this is no way to treat a crocodile and Davao Crocodile Park should be ashamed if this is any indication of how they treat Pangil. It's hard to tell with short clips like this just how often this happens. The videos were also filmed in 2009, so the question is has anything changed in the way he's treated, particularly after Lolong died after being kept under very similar circumstances. One of the contributors to Lolong's death was the daily draining of his pool (which led to high levels of stress) coupled with his entire body weight sitting on unyielding concrete. However, even Lolong wasn't poked and prodded for amusement as seems to be happening here. Lolong's pool was also 3-4 times the size of this, and he could freely walk around and bask on land which seems impossible here considering the fence around the edge of the pool. I note that Pangil is still alive, so it would be interesting to learn more about his current conditions. It is a great pity though that these animals are frequently not treated with much respect in captivity.